The Minimum Effort Ep.5: Alien Covenant

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In space no one can hear you snore…

Join Ben and Lewis as they take a pretty critical look at Ridley Scott’s latest offering- Alien Covenant, complete with literary references, religious allusions, and flutes.
There’s also a brief rundown of the new War for the Planet of the Apes, Dunkirk, and the Emoji Movie trailers.

Doctor Who – Insert Clickbait Here…

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So it was announced last week, although from what I remember rumours have been circulating for a while, that Peter Capaldi will be hanging up his TARDIS key at the end of the year, meaning the search for his replacement is on. But, before we jump into that, I want to take a look back at his time in the TARDIS…

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On the 4th of August Capaldi was announced as the 12th Doctor and I, for one, was pretty pleased with that. We were promised a more old school Doctor, not as unlikable as Colin Baker’s 6th, rather, more like the Grandfatherly figure of William Hartnell’s 1st doctor with a fashion choice to match. This is what I wanted. I wasn’t a fan of Matt Smith at the time (I’m still not, but I watch his last season more fondly now) and I saw Capaldi as a step in the right direction, getting away from the touchy-feely 10th and 11th Doctors (Hey, you leave David Tenant out of this- Lewis).

However, on the whole, I was pretty disappointed by Capaldi; in his first episode we saw some glimpses of the Doctor he wanted to be, but that was lost in the following campy -episodes and mopey characters. His character traits were often spoken about; an incredible over use of – “I don’t do hugs” – (which was often ignored) for example. It was clear that the writers were trying to tell us that this Doctor was an older, more distant man rather than try to show us, but that simply robbed this new trait of its impact. You see, you wouldn’t dream of hugging the older Doctors, which was exactly what I wanted to see in Capaldi’s episodes, and I honestly think that he wanted this characterisation too, but the writers were just too attached to the previous incarnations of the Doctor.  I can count the number of standout episodes from the Capaldi years on one hand- The Time Heist and the two-parter episode Under the lake/Before the Flood. Beyond that, the cast weren’t given much room at all to grow as Steven Moffat pleasured himself with the idea of sonic-fucking-sunglasses (Jesus, thank God he is leaving).

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Anticippointment (Anticipation followed by disappointment) summarises how I feel about Peter Capaldi’s time in the Tardis. I had high hopes for a different Doctor, but I think the show was let down by some really poor writing- what is new there? I would have really liked Capaldi to stick around for a few more seasons to see what he could do with a new writing team, but it just wasn’t to be. An issue may have been that I wanted to see a Malcolm Tucker- esque Doctor, which is obviously not ok for a broadcast shown at 7 O’clock on BBC one… so yeah, that has led to my anticippointment.

It’s strange though, because, looking at the numbers, the two Capaldi series have been the most successful yet in terms of viewing figures and critical reviews, which baffles me because most people I know have stopped watching the show rather than started it.

Anyway, it’s speculation time.

The precedent has been set with the Master so I honestly wouldn’t rule out a female iteration of the Doctor. Provided it isn’t as irritating as ‘Missy’ (another concept I’m sure Moffat tugs off to) I am open to a female Time Lord in the TARDIS, but who would I want behind the wheel? Well, looking through the current favourites, here are some options:

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Ben Whishaw 5/1 – An interesting choice, he was up there last time round. He would probably be a Doctor more akin to Matt Smith’s iteration. Whishaw made a very good Q in the last two Bond films, and he could make a very good Doctor.

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Richard Ayoade 6/1 – This would be bloody hysterical for two or three episodes, but after that I’m not too sure.

 

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Rory Kinnear 7/1 – Another Bond man, I like this choice- he’s more of a dad than a grandad, and not the type to be another ‘boyfriend’ Doctor. This is one of my preferred choices on this list.

 

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Miranda Hart 8/1 – No. Just No.

 

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Jason Flemyng 9/1 – Much like Kinnear, a Flemyng Doctor would be an intermediate between Capaldi and Smith, and to my knowledge he isn’t up to much which makes him free for long filming sessions.

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David Harewood 10/1 – I am game for this one as well, however he is involved in Supergirl which could interfere with filming commitments.

 

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Helena Bonham Carter 10/1 – So we would basically have two ‘Missys’ in the universe- I would find it pretty unwatchable.

 

 

Olivia Coleman’s name has also been mentioned, and she definitely has the comic ability/acting chops that would make her a very good Doctor, and considering the new show-runner wrote Broadchurch I wouldn’t be surprised to see Coleman at least get offered the role. Idris Elba is also on the list but with the upcoming Dark Tower film it looks like his Hollywood career is really starting to get going (Unless it’s, regrettably, a flop- Lewis), besides, I would much rather he be the next Bond than the next Doctor. Another element to consider when picking the next Doctor is the show’s new popularity in the US, which means the show runners are more likely to give the role to a bigger name rather than taking a punt on an unknown.

So that about wraps it up, a few of my opinions about the Capaldi years and a brief run through of some of the favourites to replace him. But what do you think? Who do you want to be the next Time Lord?

Please leave a comment below, we’d love to hear from you.

Carrie Fisher- a Tribute

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In a year that had already taken Gordon Henley (Garven Dreis), Ian Liston (Wes Janson) and even Kenny Baker (R2-D2) from us, 2016 then left the biggest kick in the gut until the very end- Carrie Fisher, Princess Leia. After suffering a cardiac arrest while on a flight to Los Angeles, she was rushed to intensive care, and unfortunately passed away yesterday afternoon.

As one of only three women with speaking roles in the original trilogy (the others being little more than cameos), Leia was often the sole female presence in a cast dominated by men. Furthermore, unlike Luke’s iconic green lightsaber or Han’s hairy sidekick, Leia had no instantly recognisable “gimmick” to fall back on. Despite this, Leia stood shoulder-to-shoulder with her male co-stars, proving an inspiration to a generation of fans, and providing a role model to millions of young girls across the world. Leia managed to subvert many clichés throughout the original trilogy; she may have held the title of Princess, but she never once acted as a damsel in distress- as much as Han Solo would have liked to believe otherwise. In the Death Star she resisted torture and the destruction of her home planet, and on Tatooine, in spite of her now infamous attire, it was Leia who killed the crime-lord Jabba. Finally, years later, it was Leia who led the Resistance against the First Order.

In real life, Carrie Fisher had her demons. Her addictions and afflictions are well-documented, and so I feel little need to dwell on that again. Instead, what is more important is despite all of these problems, she never gave up, and dragged herself out from her own personal hell. She never shied away from the truth, often speaking candidly about her problems, culminating in her being awarded an Outstanding Lifetime Achievement Award for Cultural Humanism by Harvard earlier this year. Her own struggles helped her understand those of others- including the PTSD of musician and former soldier James Blunt. Instead of letting her demons engulf her, Carrie decided to use them to better the lives of others- and that is what I believe her legacy will really be.

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In more recent times, Fisher had moved into a role similar to that of Leia in the Force Awakens. Using her unique life experiences, she mentored the aforementioned Blunt, as well as taking Star Wars’ new star Daisy Ridley under her wing. Even in the brief glimpses of their relationship from interviews, it is obvious that Carrie used her wisdom to try and prevent the new star from making the same mistakes that she herself had, advising Daisy on fame and fighting for the right to her own wardrobe, among others.

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Carrie Fisher lived a remarkable life. Her roles as Leia Organa and the “Mystery Woman” in the Blues Brothers make her the equal of Hollywood royalty. Her struggles with addiction, and her subsequent recovery, with all the infamy that surrounded it, made her a tragic figure. Her self-reinvention as a role model, using those experiences to make the lives of luckier people better, made her a caring, empathetic person. All of these things make her passing all the more poignant, the timing being just the icing on a very bitter cake.

In the end, whether you choose to remember Carrie Fisher as a feminist icon, a troubled actor, or simply as the person who played a badass character on a film you like, it is undoubtable that the world is a worse place for her loss. Moreover, at only 60 years of age, it is one that has been felt far too soon. Though, if I had to choose a way to go, drowning in moonlight while being strangled by my own bra would probably be up there.

RIP Carrie Fisher

 

By Pete

Rebels Review: S3E7 “Imperial Supercommandos”

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Lewis: Alright, where do you want to start? Overall impressions?

Ben: Yeah, I thought it was a pretty strong episode all in all; a nice call back to previous episodes.

Lewis: I quite enjoyed it, like you said it was a nice continuation of Fenn Rau’s story since we haven’t seen him in quite a while. It was also cool to see Sabine’s heritage being explored a bit more.

Ben: To be honest I completely forgot that he was involved in the series until this episode. The Mandalorians are pretty intriguing part of the universe, I would like to see a bit more of them though.

Lewis: I hadn’t forgotten about him but I didn’t really know where he was or what he was doing- apparently just playing board games in a prison cell.

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I’ll agree with you on that, they are still a little mysterious in terms of their character, but maybe that’s their appeal? What did you think of the conflict between Sabine and Rau? Believable?

Ben: You have a better memory than I do then. I think it is- she changed sides a couple of times and the Mandolorians never really supported the Republic or the Separatist before and are really only out for themselves during the Galactic civil war. So yeah, I buy it.

Lewis: I liked that story-line- it’s interesting to see a faction that doesn’t have an affiliation with either side, and the conflict between Rau and Sabine was cool.

Ben: I think we have a bit of a thing for characters that sit in the middle and don’t affiliate with the light or the dark sides…

Lewis: I do love a good grey area, and since Star Wars is heavily based around the battle between the light and dark sides it’s cool to explore other area of the universe.
How about the villain of this episode?

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Ben: I didn’t mind him, but he was a classic villain of week character- it needed a bit of development.

Lewis: I’m pretty sure we’ll be seeing that chap again though, since he seemed pretty keen to kill Rau and Sabine

Ben: We will definitely see him again, especially now Rau has joined the Rebels. He also had links to Sabine’s mother so perhaps we will explore her background a bit more.

Lewis: Well if the sneak-peek we saw at SWCE is anything to go by, (potential spoilers ahead), the Mandalorians might be featured quite a bit this season. We saw Sabine holding the Darksaber after all, so maybe one episode will take us to Mandalore itself in order for her to see her family and somehow acquire the Darksaber?

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Ben: That’s true, they need to get hold of the Darksaber first though. I thought Maul had it but we shall see. I am quite looking forward to seeing Mandalore properly again though, especially without the politics we saw in the Clone Wars.

Lewis: I thought he lost it? Here’s where my limited knowledge of the Clone Wars comes back to haunt me… I’ll certainly be interested to see what they end up doing with the storyline, but I honestly thought we’d see the Darksaber in this episode.

Ben: I’m pretty sure Maul had it, we shall have to wait and see where it appears next. I thought that too, but perhaps it come back in an episode that allows us to see its full back story.

Lewis: Indeed, and I suppose it is a big enough plot-device that it would be a little rushed if it were crammed into this episode. As you said, it needs its own episode, especially if they’re going to Mandalore and Sabine’s mother is involved.
So how about Ezra in this episode?

Ben: I didn’t mind Ezra, he had enough to do to make sure he wasn’t wasted but he didn’t get in the way of the bigger story.

Lewis: Yeah, sometimes they just throw him into the other crew members’ storylines because he’s the lead (cough- The Antilles Extraction- cough) but this time they wrote him in fairly well, without it being clumsy or unnecessary.

Ben: I couldn’t agree more.
The little jetpack action scene was pretty sweet too.

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Lewis: The action in this was really fun- the Jetpack scene was a lot better than I remember it being when we saw it at SWCE, and I loved the hand-to-hand.

Ben: It was a pretty fun sequence- was it longer than it was at SWCE? The hand-to-hand was a pretty intense fight… the best matched one we have had.
What did you make of the Fenn-Rau-fake-out?

Lewis: I think we saw more than they showed us at SWCE, which is understandable since you want to avoid spoilers. As for the fake out, it’s a pretty cliched move at this point in terms of plots, but I didn’t mind it to be honest. Everybody likes a redemption/the cavalry coming to the rescue.

Ben: Yeah I didn’t really mind it- it is a bit overused, but it’s kids show- they need to build the tension somehow.

Lewis: Exactly, and while we’ve seen it a thousand times the kids who watch it might not have. So, do you reckon that’s about it?

Ben: I think so, I can’t remember anything else happening…

Lewis: Awesome, so that was a decent episode, I’m not sure what’s coming up next though?

Ben: No I have no idea what’s next, I imagine Maul will have to come back soon.

 

Well you’ve seen what we had to say about this episode of Star Wars Rebels, but what about your opinion? It’s probably infinitely more interesting than our own, so why not leave a comment below? And if you’re feeling particularly generous, there’s a like button around here somewhere… 

Rebels Review S3E4: Hera’s Heroes

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Ben: So in this week’s Rebels instalment we’re given another personal adventure (-ish). This time Hera takes the lead as we go to her home planet of Ryloth…

Lewis: Indeed, and we’re reintroduced to Cham Syndulla and his resistance. I liked the exploration of Twi-Lek culture in this episode, but honestly it felt a bit secondary to the Thrawn plot point.

Ben: I think the Twi-Leks were vital to properly introducing Thrawn. In the books, and now in the show, he studies the culture of a race not just their tactics. The Twi-Leks are the easiest way to explore this side of him as we’re already familiar with Cham and Hera.

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Lewis: I agree, they were essential to building his character and the various themes that are explored in the novels, but let’s discuss some of those later. Shall we talk about Cham and the fact that, while he is one of the best tacticians in the Rebel alliance, Thrawn outplayed him?

Ben: Cham proved himself a brilliant guerrilla warfare tactician during the Clone Wars, and ran rings around the Imperial officers on Ryloth- It is only when Thrawn takes over that the tide turns. Says a lot about Thrawn to be able beat an experienced commander on his own turf.

Lewis: Exactly, they’re slowly allowing us to see just how much of a badass Thrawn is, and just how much trouble the Rebels are getting into.

Ben: But not a fighting badass; he out-thinks his opponent and then gets others to out-gun them.

Lewis: Although he did demonstrate that he’s handy with a weapon when he stunned Ezra- neither Hera nor Ezra saw that coming, and he looked pretty quick with that blaster. I think he’s proficient in the use of weapons but prefers out-smarting his enemies.

Ben: I suppose that is true, but it really stems from him out-thinking the rebels and knowing that they “Always have friends rushing to the rescue.”

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Lewis: What did you think of the little side-plot of the distraction?

Ben: Ah yes, the side-adventure that gives the other crew members something to do. I mean, it was ok- fairly forgettable. I did think the Twi-Lek with the rocket launcher was going to miss the AT-ST and sell Cham and the others out for a second, but that was quickly put to bed.

Lewis: I had that exact same thought. Also, seeing as we saw Kanan blow up an AT-ST at the end using a rocket, surely it would have made more sense to actually hit the thing? Anyway… Like you said, it was enjoyable enough, and it did actually manage to build a sense of tension. Given that we’re talking about how the others were risking their lives on this mission, I had a bit of a problem with Hera’s motivations; I don’t think the art piece was enough of a reason to go on the mission.

Ben: I suppose it means a lot to her culture, but in reality it was just something to show Thrawn’s thought process more than anything.

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Lewis: For me that was a bit of an issue because they should’ve focussed a little more on Hera rather than just using her to set up Thrawn. Shall we talk about the aspects of his character that they’ve begun to develop in this episode?

Ben: I guess you’re right, but ultimately the show’s point of view is focused on the rebels, they won’t shift perspective to develop Thrawn. And yes, beyond being a bloody genius, he has to deal with a certain amount of prejudice from other Imperial officers.

Lewis: No, which is why I think they were a tiny-little-bit clumsy in using Hera to build up Thrawn… that being said, I really do appreciate them giving us a villain who actually has some realistic motivations and personality (unlike the inquisitors of the second season…). The racism and prejudice that they’re showing this season is the most interesting part for me. It’s a part of the Empire we haven’t really seen so much in the canon material (it was substantially explored in the EU), and it’s cool that they’re comfortable going into those themes in this show- it also makes Thrawn an almost sympathetic character.

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Ben: Yeah I found that, I actually quite liked him- even if it felt bizarre to actually like a Rebels villain. He definitely has more depth than all of the past adversaries they’ve faced, and through that depth we’re being shown the real dark side of the Empire. In the films all we really see is them running around after the Rebellion, but this story emphasises the need for the Rebellion in the first place.

Lewis: I don’t think I could say that I like him, but I really like his character- as you said, he has depth. The characterisation in this episode made him even more interesting, and I think it’s just going to get better as the season goes on. The issues of the conflict and the true nature of the Empire is certainly turning the Civil War into a more realistic/developed idea.

Ben: “Like” may be the wrong word, but I appreciate his character, and you do in a way feel for him. This season is definitely adding an extra dimension to the Civil war.

Lewis: And I’m liking this dimension- it feels more grown up than the last two seasons, what with the spiritual exploration with the Bendu, and the introduction of the Empire’s racism and ruthlessness with Thrawn and that little segment in Wedge’s episode when Skerris destroys the unarmed transport. Shall we talk about the conclusion of the episode? I particularly enjoyed chopper getting up to his usual hijinks…

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Ben: Ah yes, the prisoner exchange turned demolition of the house, it was fairly impressive. Where did all those thermal detonators come from though?

Lewis: In the end Hera had to sacrifice her family’s legacy in order to save her friends. I thought they found the armoury and just used the equipment from there?

Ben: Oh yeah. So after they destroyed the house, Thrawn let them go again.

Lewis: I wonder how many times he’s going to let them go before he decides to finish it once and for all? I mean, I appreciate the fact that it makes his character more interesting than the average Imperial Officer, but surely that trick is going to get a little old?

Ben: I think he will keep letting them go until he finds the entire Rebel fleet, or he will capture the crew once he knows the strength of the Rebellion in an attempt to draw them out- I think this will continue for a bit longer.

Lewis: He’s certainly learning a lot about them, and that will most likely lead to their downfall if they aren’t careful. So, overall, what did you think of this one?

Ben: I liked this episode, it may actually be my favourite so far. I know that Hera is a bit neglected in exchange for Thrawn to be developed, but I am sure we will get another chance to see Hera in action.

Lewis: I enjoyed it too, and the glimpse of Thrawn’s true character was certainly one of the highlights of this season so far. Although my favourite of the season is still The Antilles Extraction for its focus on the pilots of the Rebellion… I guess we’ll call it there then?

Ben: I guess so, bring on the next one.

Again, as usual, if you feel like we missed anything, or simply want to let us know what you thought of “Hera’s Heroes”, please don’t hesitate to leave a comment down below. And if you, somehow, liked this piece, why not give it a favourite or share it?

No pressure or anything

Rebels Review: S3E2 “The Holocrons of Fate”

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Lewis: So after an interesting, but kind of middling season premiere, Star Wars Rebels brings back an old foe/friend for the second episode “The Holocrons of Fate”
What did you think?

Ben: I liked this episode, we got to see a lot of development in the relationships between Maul, Ezra and Kanan.

Lewis: Ezra and Kanan finally managed to break through the distance that had grown between them since the end of season 2, although I’m not entirely sure it’ll last very long…

Ben: Yes it still seems a bit uneasy; Kanan has changed his perspective since his blinding while Ezra has begun to depend more on his ‘saber and aggression. I think we can expect to see further strain on the relationship.

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Lewis: Although Kanan used to be like that too to an extent… I don’t know, it just seems like it was all healed too quickly for it to last.

Ben: I think that is where the tension rises from- They have both become very different people.

Lewis: Now I guess Kanan has to guide Ezra towards becoming like him, before he goes down a different path. Speaking of different people, how about the Bendu though? He seems like more of a benevolent creature now.

Ben: He is an interesting guide for the two of them to have.

Lewis: I’m liking him more and more, he’s sort of a Yoda character but dare I say a little more interesting because of his nature?

Ben: He is a grey Yoda, and like we said last week, the Bendu scenes are not action packed but the character and his nature makes his scene some of the most interesting.

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Lewis: Mmmmm, I hope they do a lot more with his character. I particularly liked the moment when Kanan takes Ezra’s ‘saber away before he goes in the cave, and Bendu is confused as to why- It was a nice call back to Empire, and it showed, again, how differently the Bendu thinks compared to other characters we’re familiar with. Also, I take back what I said, he’s not more interesting than Yoda, I don’t know why I said that, but he’s a good character.

Ben: Shall we move forward and mention how rubbish the crew of the Ghost were this week?

Lewis: They were a little lacking… It felt like the only reason they were there was to progress the plot for Kanan and Ezra.

Ben: It was a very force-user heavy episode, but I’m sure they will get their chance to be in the spotlight.

Lewis: Well it looks like Sabine will next episode, and Hera has her episode coming up too.

Ben: One thing this episode did was show how powerful Maul is; following the escape attempt he recaptured the crew without breaking sweat.

Lewis: I liked that part, but it felt as though the Ghost crew would be a little harder to recapture than they were. Anyway, Maul was very impressive this episode I wonder when we’ll see him again?

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Ben: I reckon he will appear now and again, I expected this episode to be the first part of two to be honest.

Lewis: Same here. Until the last five minutes I thought it would be a two-parter, which I suppose is why the last act felt a little rushed. I guess if we’re talking about Maul reappearing later in the show, should we move on to what he and Ezra saw in the vision?

Ben: Well I think it is pretty clear the two of the saw Tatooine and Obi-Wan.

Lewis: Well I thought that as well, and I do think that Maul meant Obi-Wan when he said “he lives”, but we don’t know whether they saw the same thing. And Maul said that he was looking for hope when he looked into the Holocrons, so would that mean Obi-Wan? I think they might both have seen Luke and Tatooine, hence the “hope” reference. Maybe Maul will go to Tatooine hoping to recruit Luke and instead find Obi-Wan protecting him?

Ben: Potentially, if they did see different things Maul may have seen his brother, although I am pretty sure Savage is dead.

Lewis: That’s definitely a possibility, but I feel like that would be a bit cheap considering that he seemed very dead… You could say the way Palpatine killed him was pretty… savage

 

Ben: I definitely feel that we are heading towards a show down between Obi Wan and Maul which would be really cool, however for it to fit into continuity Ezra and Kanan cannot be there.

Lewis: I would very much like to see that- finish the fight once and for all. Although Maul didn’t seem angry when he saw the vision, he seemed more excited/shocked So do you think he might feel like he and Obi-wan are sort of even now after Satine and he just wants to see him? Go for a pint? And I think they could work around Kanan and Ezra meeting Obi-Wan, but it would be difficult.

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Ben: Nah, I think Maul is going all out to kill him. Alternatively he could have figured out who Vader is and we could have a pretty cool Vader vs Maul fight. I mean they could work their way around the continuity, but they I think it would cheapen it with Kanan and Ezra just conveniently not being around.

Lewis: That would be pretty sweet, but I think the emotional pay-off would be greater with the Maul-Obi Wan showdown. Although that does scupper my plans in terms of the Boba Fett- Obi Wan movie I’ve been hoping for. And yeah I guess you’re right about it cheapening the story, but if Kanan and Ezra die eventually then there won’t be a problem…

Ben: I was thinking that- if they die or turn away from the Jedi order then you are right, there is no issue.

Lewis: It’d certainly be interesting to just see them give it all up- but I can’t see them doing that as the characters they are at the moment. Our good friend Pete reckons that Ezra’s rashness will lead to someone getting killed- possibly Hera- and then Kanan turning against him and them killing each other or something along those lines.

Ben: I am not sure about that, I know there are some grey tones in the show but at the end of the day it is a Kids show. One of the crew could get injured but I doubt one of them will die and I cannot see them (Kanan and Ezra) fighting to the death.

Lewis: I think it’s a little darker than you give it credit for, and honestly I could definitely see something along those lines happening- maybe not the fight to the death- but something like that.

Ben: I am yet to be convinced that something like that will happen.

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Lewis: We shall see, we shall see. Although I believe someone involved in the show stated that these three seasons follow a similar tone pattern to the original trilogy, which implies that last season was the darkest/most serious the show will ever get, and that this one will be a bit of a let-down and involve teddy bears of some sort (I kid). Anyway, I think we’ve rambled for long enough What did you reckon of the episode overall?

Ben: Please, no Ewoks. I liked it- level with the first episode. I appreciate the investigations into alternative areas on the spectrum of the force and the vision was interesting.

Lewis: Agreed, a solid episode! And I’m very much looking forward to the next one, “The Antilles Extraction”…

Ben: Does that mean what I think it means? Will we get to see Wedge make his Rebels debut?

Lewis: Ohhhhhhhhhhhhhh yeah.

Ben: Get in.

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Happy Anniversary, dear

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Well, well, well, well, well…

One year, huh? I have to admit, I wasn’t sure whether we’d still be doing this after a month, let alone a year… but here we are.

I remember it like it was yesterday…

*Insert shimmery flashback filter and harp music*

-Cuts to three teenagers sitting in a reggae bar in Stratford-

Last summer, before an outdoor viewing of Reservoir Dogs, I asked Ben and another friend whether they wanted to help me make a blog that we could use to; A) act as a creative outlet for our boredom, and B) engage with other people about shared interests. Ben was immediately enthusiastic about it (our other friend less so, but maybe they’ll contribute something in the future). I’ll be honest, if it weren’t for Ben pressuring me to write and edit our content, almost half of it wouldn’t see the light of day. So I think our partnership was a good idea; the blog wouldn’t be possible without him.

(dry your eyes, Ben. It’s unprofessional to get sentimental too often)

Obviously we’ve had people help us out; Alex joined us for a couple of very popular pieces, and Connor will occasionally pop up from the woodwork to offer articles about some of the strangest movies I’ve never heard of.

We also had some fun with Pete and Ben making the podcasts, even if the discussions became stupidly heated and heatedly stupid on a number of occasions. It was all in good fun of course, even if they were wrong almost all the time, and we’ll hopefully see the return of them soon enough. A promise that I’m both keen and not so keen to fulfill, since the podcasts were incredibly fun to film, but incredibly not so fun to edit, but it’s all worth it in the end.

Last, but not least, we had a couple of collaborations with Michael of Four Eyes Productions (yes, a couple, I just haven’t finished editing the other yet…). We’ll definitely be doing more of that in the future; I don’t think we’ve ever had a more agreeable “fight” about films.

All in all, I think we’ve come a long way since we set out to put a stop to our summer boredom, even if we haven’t yet reached the level of content or quality we want to get to. We will get there though, even if it means slogging through another year before we do. More podcasts, more trailer talks, more articles and, hopefully, a few more people willing to help us out.

Thank you all for your support this past year, and I hope that in the following months we can produce at least one piece of content that either makes you laugh, sparks a discussion, or gets you interested in something new.

The next year’s gonna be a good’un!